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Axis & Allies: Classic - Smith House Rules (R. Scott Smith)

This is a haphazard listing of the house rules we play with. The rules aren't organized in any particular manner, and not all of the rules are necessary. We tried to incorporate rules from other sets of house rules, without adding too much complexity (and the list below is the "Not Too Complex" result).

The rules were added gradually, and have not been proofread (thus there may be contradictions within. If you find any, please let me know.)

The rules consist of three parts: the first part is a list of general rule changes. The second part is a modified Weapon Development table. The third is a set of Optional Player Advantage rules.

House RulesEdit

By R. Scott Smith and his faithful sidekicks Tim Knapp, Dana Gourley, Dan (something or other), Dave Rae, and the "I didn't do it" Dancers. (With blatant theft from numerous sets of house rules. Thanks to all who have been stolen from. :)

Random Turns: Following the first Russian turn, all turns are determined randomly by drawing player markers from a cup (the Russian marker should be removed, and returned for turn 2, as should the American marker if the USA has used the "First Strike Advantage"(q.v.)) As each player has his turn, his marker is removed from the cup. When all players have had their turn, the chips are returned to the cup.

Divided Sea zones: Certain seazones have been divided vertically. The Britain seazone, Japan seazone, and the Red Sea zone. Britain and Japan are no longer considered to be islands.

Air Assault of Islands: Planes may attack islands as if they were part of the surrounding seazone. It does not cost any extra movement to attack the island. An island is defined as any land mass completely surrounded by a single seazone. It still costs a movement point to take off from or land on an island.

Directed Research: Weapons development rolls for technologies that have already been developed are cheaper than normal. For every power that has a technology, the cost of a "Tech roll" for that development is reduced by 1 IPC. (This rule will result in a rapid spread of technology as it is discovered.)

Espionage, Enemy Code, Industrial Technology, and Advanced Labs may not be discovered by Directed Research.

Amphibious Assaults: Naval bombardment shots from battleships take effect immediately (the casualties don't shoot back). Units that attack from a transport may not retreat. Other land forces can retreat as normal. Planes can retreat at any time individually or all together.

Retreats: At the end of any combat round the attacker may declare a retreat. Units may retreat to 1 adjacent friendly territory that was not involved in combat (bombing raids excluded). The attacker announces if he is retreating and if not then the defender decides whether or not to retreat. Ground units must always retreat together except when some are air/sea assault and others are not. In those cases the land assault units may retreat and the air/sea assault units must stay and fight. Ships must all retreat together to the same sea-zone except subs which may withdraw like normal. Ships may not retreat to any sea-zone from which an enemy ship came. Planes may retreat separately from the other forces. Attacking planes retreat with the remainder of their movement. The procedure for Defender retreats is different. Prior to the defence roll, the defender must declare which armies he is reatreating, if any. Retreating armies DO NOT get a defence roll. They forfeit this roll to retreat. (Note that "casualties" get to defend as usual, as they cannot retreat) Retreating planes that have scrambled can retreat up to half their normal movement or they can retreat down to their original territory (either carrier or hanger). Note: if a fighter on a carrier doesn't scramble and the carrier is sunk, the fighter is lost (It is almost always a bad idea not to scramble fighters.)

Dogfights: Any time air units are present in both attacking and defending forces a dogfight may ensue. After shore bombardment and AA gun fire the defender must decide which air units to scramble. An unscrambled plane stays in the hanger, defends at 0, may only retreat with the other land units but may be a casualty of the ground assault. A scrambled air unit takes off to do battle with the attacking planes. All fighters involved in a dogfight attack and defend at 3 (except Jet Power). Bombers involved in a dogfight attack and defend at 1. Planes are assigned to the dogfight until one side runs out of planes. The other side may use the remaining planes in the dogfight or as ground support. The dogfight is conducted simultaneously with the ground assault. Units in one may not be taken as casualties of the other. Aircraft carriers have the option of attacking planes involved in a dogfight. If a carrier chooses to dogfight, it attacks and defends normally, but is subject to a hit by enemy planes. A damaged carrier may not participate in a dogfight.

Strategic Bombings: When a territory containing fighters or bombers is strategically bombed, the defending power has the option of scrambling his defending planes. These planes must be dispatched in a dogfight before the strategic bombing can occur. If defending planes scramble, the attacker may declare that nearby fighters are escorts. These fighters are involved in the dogfight prior to the strategic bombing. Any fighters doing escort duty may not be used for other attacks during that turn. Strategic bombings take place before any other attacks are declared. Order of Combat: Let's assume an amphibious assault assisted by a land attack and paratroops. First the attacker completes all combat movement. Next the defenders fire any AA guns. Now defender sets aside a land unit for each attacking land unit and paratrooper. Next the attacker conducts shore bombardment against the remaining forces, casualties are removed. Now the regular combat round begins. The defender decides which if any planes will scramble. Any extra planes are assigned to the dogfight or as ground support. Planes in the dogfight conduct one round of combat, casualties removed. If the attacker has planes assigned to ground support he must now assign targets to all of them then fire, casualties moved behind the line. Remaining attacking units fire, casualties moved behind the line. If defender has air units doing ground support he assigns targets and fires, casualties removed. All remaining defending units fire, casualties from both sides removed. Note: during any combat round only the attacker or the defender, not both, will have planes assigned as ground support. Now attacker must announce if he is continuing the ground attack or retreating. If attacking the defender must decide whether to stay and fight or retreat. The attacker may retreat planes, the defender may retreat planes. The defender decides to scramble any planes still on the ground, planes are matched up for the dogfight. Extras are assigned to the dogfight or ground support. Dogfight conducted. Subs for attacker, air support for attacker, land attack for attacker, air support for defender, land combat for defender. Process repeats until combat is concluded.

Winning: The game is over if the Axis player can capture the Russian and British capitols or the American capitol, or attain 84 IPC income (100 if Neutral Territories used). The Allies win if they capture both Axis capitols or if the Axis surrenders.

Straits: If a side controls both sides of a strait, he may forbid surface ships from crossing it (unlike a canal, where submarines cannot cross it either). The following are Straits:

  • Gibraltar - Algeria
  • Western Europe - Sweden
  • Turkey (who alone controls the entrance to the Black Sea)

While Neutral, Sweden ALLOWS both sides through the strait (thus the strait is freely traversable by surface ships). While Neutral, Turkey FORBIDS both sides passage through the strait (thus the power controlling Eastern Europe controls entrance to the Black Sea).

Bribed Overflights: At a cost of $3 (per province) a player may bribe a neutral province to overlook air-units overflights. The bribe would allow violation of the Neutral airspace by as many air units as desired during one (nation's) turn. This action does not cause the Neutral to become occupied or to become less Neutral.

Capturing A Capital: When a capital is captured, the attacker is awarded the cash of the defender. A player whose capital is captured continues to collect income (from his other provinces) PROVIDED he still retains an Production Complex. However, his income collected at this temporary capitol (which must be declared) is only half normal. Units may be produced as normal. If this temporary capital is lost, the player's IPCs must be turned over to the conquering player. If the player still retains an Industrial Complex, it becomes his new temporary capital. Note: friendly armies occupying territory of a capitol-less power may collect income from those territories. However, they must cease to do this when a viable capital or temporary-capital appears. Thus allies may NEVER produce on a friendly production centre.

Transports: A Transport must do all its pick-ups (in a given turn) at the same place. A Transport may only do one amphibious assault per turn, but if may drop off armies in more than one location during the non-combat movement (provided it has not participated in the combat phase.) Amphibious landing units may not retreat from battle, other units with them (such as air units) may retreat, leaving the marines to fight on their own.

Placing Naval Units in Enemy-Occupied Sea Zones: With this new rules variation, you may place new naval units in *enemy-occupied* sea zones adjacent to industrial complexes you have owned since the beginning of your turn. It is up to your enemy to either retreat from the sea zone or attack your ships. This changes the game a fair amount, although no side can claim an unfair advantage. In the normal rules, placing your ships in enemy zones in effect constitutes a naval blockade and shutdown of enemy shipyards. The optional rule neutralizes this tactic, and allows full use of all shipbuilding potential.

Port Guns: Anti-aircraft weapons stationed at territories containing production centres may fire on aircraft attacking adjacent naval vessels.

Air Missions: Air units may fly over occupied land or sea territories to attack other targets. They are not subject to attacks by units stationed in those territories, but are subject to AA fire.

Submarine Units: When attacking, submarine units choose what units are destroyed on successful hits. The defender does not choose which targets are destroyed unless he has Super Sub development. Furthermore, submarine units are not always visible from the air. Air units that have been committed to attack submarines have a 3 in 6 chance of detecting the submarine. This increases by 1 for every additional attacking air unit above 1 (thus 4 planes will automatically detect submarines). If the sub is not detected, the plane[s] cannot attack and their combat round is wasted. In addition, submarines may move through occupied sea zones without engaging enemy ships. The chance of hostile ships detecting a submarine is the same as for planes (3 in 6 if one vessel, 4 in 6 if two vessels), and if detected, the invading submarine must either engage the vessels or retreat to his original sea-zone.

Damaged Units: Battleships and aircraft carriers, unlike all other units, are not destroyed if successfully hit in combat. They are relegated to damaged status. Damaged battleships and carriers have a movement of 1 unit. Damaged battleships attack and defend at 2, rather than 4, and may not shore bombard during amphibious assaults. Damaged carriers have no attack capability and defend at 1. They may not carry any fighters. If a damaged unit is stationed adjacent to a friendly industrial complex, the owner of the complex may repair the unit during his turn. Battleships cost 10 IPCs to repair, and carriers cost 7 IPCs to repair. Repairs must be declared at the beginning of the turn, and the units to be repaired are removed from the board. During the new unit placement stage, the repaired units are returned to the board. (An alternative rule assumes that aircraft carriers attack and defend by means of an intrinsic fighter squadron. Thus damaged carriers have reduced attack/defense capability, but still move at 2 and may still carry fighters. HOWEVER, any attack by a sub sinks the carrier outright.) Initial Conditions:

  • Soviets: The Soviets may not attack during their first turn of play. They may perform non-combat moves and purchases as normal.
  • Axis: As their populations are enthusiastic about the war, Germany and Japan get a bonus of $8 and $4, respectively, in the beginning and the end of the first turn. Afterward, "when the body-bags arrive home, and people realize that war is hell", no more bonus.

Neutral TerritoriesEdit

The neutral countries now have an IPC value and an indigenous force. They may be attacked by any player at any time in which case the indigenous force defends against the attack. If the attack succeeds, the territory falls under the control of the attacker. If the attack fails the country remains neutral, defended by the surviving force. If a player controls a country adjacent to a neutral he may take it over using Economic conquest. Britain is considered adjacent to Eire for this purpose, as are territories across from canals or straits (q.v.) To do this he pays the IPC value of the country and declares the attempt. He then does all of his other builds. Now he rolls 1 die. If he rolls a 1 or a 2 the country and its force falls under his immediate control and he can use them that turn. He may move other of his land forces into that territory during non-combat movement. Planes may also land in neutral countries on the turn they are taken over by Economic Conquest but not ones taken by combat. If an enemy player also controls a territory adjacent to the neutral he can attempt to interfere with the roll. He does this by also paying the IPC value and declaring his intent. This can be done any time before the dice are rolled. Only 1 enemy player may interfere at a time. Now if a 6 is rolled the country goes to the enemy player instead. No player may fly planes over a country while it is neutral or else it falls under control of the nearest enemy player.

CountryIPC Value Indigenous Force
Mongolia 1 1 Infantry
Afghanistan 1 1 Infantry
Turkey 3 2 Infantry, 1 Tank
Saudi Arabia 1 1 Infantry
Mozambique 1 1 Infantry
Angola 1 1 Infantry
Rio de Oro 1 1 Infantry
Spain 4 3 Infantry, 1 Tank
Switzerland 3 2 Infantry, 1 Fighter
Sweden 3 2 Infantry, 1 Transport
Eire 1 1 Infantry
Venezuela/Col. 3 2 Infantry, 1 Tank
Peru 2 2 Infantry
Argentina/Chile 3 2 Infantry, 1 Transport

Note: Transports should be placed in sea-zones not containing enemy ships if possible. If this is not possible the transports are placed anyway (they were there all along but were neutral and so not important). Thus any amphibious assault on a neutral must eliminate the transport first. If a transport must be placed in a sea zone with an enemy ship it must stay and fight or withdraw only 1 space during combat movement. If this withdraw causes it to enter another enemy sea zone it must fight there.

Weapons DevelopmentsEdit

Roll 1 die and consult the table below. If more than one technology is available, the player may choose. (e.g., if the player rolls a 5, he may choose between Heavy Bombers, Jet Power, or Long-Range Air)

  1. Enemy Code or Espionage.
  2. Elite Forces
  3. Radar/Sonar or Rockets
  4. Super Subs, Heavy Ships, or Long-Range Ships
  5. Heavy Bombers, Jet Power, or Long-Range Aircraft
  6. Improved Labs, Improved Agriculture, or Industrial Technology

Development Descriptions:

  • Enemy Code: The player has cracked the code of 1 enemy UK:Ger, US:Jap, Rus:Ger or Jap, Ger:UK or Rus, Jap: US or Rus. Once in a game round when the enemies control marker is drawn you may send it back into the cup. Rus, Ger, and Jap should place the control marker of the opponent whose code they cracked under their marker on the tech chart. Only used if optional "random turns" rule is in effect.
  • Espionage: You have established a spy network that may try to steal tech from any one player (even allies) once per turn. May not steal Enemy Code, Industrial Tech, Espionage, Improved Agri, or Elite Forces. Roll 1d6.
  • 1: Agents killed, may not steal tech from that player again for the rest of the game! Place his control marker under yours on the tech chart to show this. (If ally, only 50% chance of network being eliminated.)
  • 2-4: Attempt failed.
  • 5: Random tech stolen, network discovered. May not steal tech from that player for the rest of the game. (If ally, only 50% chance of network being eliminated.)
  • 6: Random technology stolen.
  • Radar/Sonar: May equip AA guns with radar. AA guns hit on a 1 or 2. Radar equiping costs 5 IPCs per gun. Also, player's ships are no longer surprised by submarines. Submarines may not "sneak" through occupied territory, and planes automatically discover subs.
  • Elite Forces: Choose one of the following:
  • Mechanized Infantry - Infantry may move 2 sections if accompanied by one armor unit per infantry unit moved. This only applies to infantry and tanks starting their movement from the same territory. Mechanized infantry attack at 2 for the first round of combat.
  • Super Armor - Armor units attack at 4 for the first round of any combat turn, and defend at 3 for the first round of a defending combat turn. On the second and succeeding combat rounds the armor units attack at the usual 3, and defend at the usual 2.
  • Paratroopers - If a bomber and an Infantry unit start the turn on the same territory the bomber can carry it and drop it off as either a combat or non-combat move. Any AA guns get to fire before the unit is dropped. Bombers involved in a parachute drop can do no other actions that turn. Only 1 infantry unit (2 or 3 for Heavy Bombers) may be transported this way per bomber in a turn. Paratroopers get a +1 on their attack for the entire combat but cannot retreat. After the combat their stats return to normal.
  • Marines - Infantry on amphibious assaults attack at 2 for the duration of the assault.
  • Kamikaze (Japan only) - Japanese fighters have a special attack mode against naval units. Japanese fighters may attack without a viable landing option, thus having an effective attacking range of 4. However, they only get one round of attack, with a special attack of 4. Further, the attacker determines which enemy units are destroyed in the combat. At the end of this first round of combat, all kamikaze fighters are destroyed. The "kamikaze" attack must be declared at the beginning of combat. In addition, all Japanese fighters may be purchased at a cost of 10, rather than
  • Super Subs: All subs attack at 3, may move three, and may choose their target when defending.
  • Heavy Bombers: All bomber attacks roll 2 dice. Subsequent Heavy bomber development increases this to 3 dice.
  • Jet Power: Fighters defend at 5 vs. land units. Attack at 4 during dogfights.
  • Rockets: AA guns to be upgraded to fire rockets. This gun has the ability to perform Rocket shots on enemy industrial complexes within a range of 3 units. Rocket attacks do economic damage, equal to 1-6 IPCs per rocket attack. Anti-aircraft guns may be upgraded at a cost of 5 IPCs. More than one upgraded Anti-aircraft gun may perform Rocket shots in any given turn.
  • Heavy Ships: Your Transports now carry 3 infs (or 1 inf+ 1 tank). Your Carriers now carry 3 fighters or 1 bomber.
  • Improved Labs: You get a free research attempt every turn.
  • Long Range Ships: Your surface ships now move 3.
  • Improved Agri: All provinces worth $3 or more controlled at the start of your turn (i.e., newly acquired territory is not eligible) will produce $1 extra. (Does not count toward economic victory).
  • Industrial Technology: The cost of purchased units is reduced by 20%, rounding up. Thus, Infantry cost 3, Armor cost 4, transports and subs cost 7, fighters cost 10, bombers cost 12, carriers cost 15, and battleships cost 20 IPCs. The cost of repairing units also decreases. Battleship repairs cost 8, while carrier repairs cost 6 IPCs.
  • Long Range Aircraft: Your fighters now move 6; your bombers 8.

Optional National AdvantagesEdit

To add a bit more variety to the game, each power gains an advantage at the beginning of the game.

This advantage is determined randomly.

Soviet UnionEdit

U.S.S.R. Advantages (Soviet Advantages assume that the USSR may not attack on the first turn. Advantages should be modified if this rule is not used.)

  1. Motherland Advantage - When defending original Soviet territory, the Soviets gain an additional defence die rolls. This defensive roll hits on a 2, and is in addition to all other defensive rolls. The number of additional die rolls is dependent on the number of Soviet (not Allied) units defending the territory. One additional roll is provided for every five defenders, rounding up. Note: this also applies to unoccupied Soviet territories. For example, a lone Japanese armor unit attempts to blitz through the Soviet Far East to attack Yakut S.S.R. In this case, the Soviet Far East gains a defensive roll of 2, and if successful, the invading armor unit is destroyed (and thus cannot proceed to Yakut S.S.R), and the Soviet Far East is still Soviet territory. The Motherland Advantage only applies to original territory, or reconquered original territory.
  2. Non-purged Infantry Advantage - Soviets gain 5 additional infantry units at the start of the game, which may be placed on either production centre.
  3. Non-purged Armor Advantage - Soviets gain 3 additional armor units at the start of the game, which may be placed on either production centre.
  4. Espionage Advantage - Soviets start the game with the Espionage weapons development.
  5. Economic Support Advantage - The Americans may transport up to 5 IPCs per turn to the Russians. This support must be sent on a transport from an American industrial complex, and may be destroyed by enemy attack during transit. The transport may be American, or Soviet, but must be "loaded" during the American turn. This transport may not carry military units if carrying support equipment. The support may be gained at the start of the Soviet turn, provided the transport is adjacent to a Soviet industrial complex. At the beginning of the game, the Americans may grant the U.S.S.R. 5 IPCs (assumed to have been transported prior to the start of the game) which may be utilized on the first Soviet turn.
  6. Far Eastern Advantage - The Soviets start the game with one additional infantry on Kazakh, Novosibirsk, Evenki Nat'l Okrug, and Yakut S.S.R.

GermanyEdit

  1. Super Sub Advantage - Germans start the game with the Super Sub weapons technology. Germany also has the option to purchase one additional submarine at the start of the game, which may be stationed with any existing German naval unit.
  2. Armor Advantage - Germany gains the Super Armor Elite Forces development.
  3. Naval Advantage - Germany gains 1 battleship. Germany also has the option of purchasing, prior to the start of the game, an additional submarine, which may be stationed in Germany, Southern Europe, or Western Europe. This purchased submarine may be utilized immediately, and need not be placed at the end of the German turn.
  4. Mechanized Infantry Advantage - Germany gains the Mechanized Infantry Elite Forces development.
  5. Advanced Labs Advantage - Germany gains the Advanced Labs development.
  6. Allied Neutral Advantage - Germany begins the game with an allied neutral country. The additional neutral is either Sweden, Switzerland, Spain, or Turkey. Germany must pay the IPC value of that country to gain the alliance, but gains the immediate use of that territory's armies. The allied country should be chosen randomly.

United KingdomEdit

  1. Production Advantage - United Kingdom starts the game with a production centre on any U.K. territory. This is a limited production centre, with a maximum production per turn equal to the IPC value of the located territory.
  2. Jet Power Advantage - United Kingdom starts the game with Jet Power weapons technology.
  3. Naval Production Advantage - All naval units produced from the United Kingdom cost 20% less. This advantage is cumulative with Industrial Technology development, if it is acquired. The United Kingdom also has the option of purchasing, prior to the start of the game, an additional naval unit, which may be stationed in any sea zone occupied by a British naval unit. This purchased unit may be utilized immediately, and need not be placed at the end of the U.K. turn.
  4. Air Production Advantage - All air units produced from the United Kingdom cost 20% less. This advantage is cumulative with Industrial Technology development, if it is acquired. The United Kingdom also has the option of purchasing, prior to the start of the game, an additional air unit, which must be stationed in the United Kindom. This purchased unit may be utilized immediately, and need not be placed at the end of the U.K. turn.
  5. Paratroopers - The U.K. starts the game with the Paratroopers Elite Forces development.
  6. Dominion Advantage - British start with two additional infantry and an additional submarine, which must be placed on the Dominion territories (Canada, Australia, India, Egypt, or South Africa) and the adjacent sea zones.

JapanEdit

  1. Production Advantage - Japan starts the game with a production center on any Japanese territory on mainland Asia. This is a limited production center, with a maximum production of 3 units per turn.
  2. Motherland Advantage - When defending original Japanese territory, the Japanese gain an additional defense die roll. This defensive roll hits on a 2, and is in addition to all other defensive rolls. The number of additional die rolls is dependent on the number of Japanese (not German) units defending the territory. One additional roll is provided for every five defenders, rounding up. Note: this also applies to unoccupied Japanese territories. For example, a lone Soviet armor unit attempts to blitz through the Manchuria to attack Kwangtung. In this case, Manchuria gains a defensive roll of 2, and if successful, the invading armor unit is destroyed (and thus cannot proceed to Kwangtung), and Manchuria is still Japanese territory. The Motherland Advantage only applies to original territory, or reconquered original territory.
  3. Infantry Advantage - Japan starts with two additional infantry units on each Japanese territory on mainland Asia.
  4. Kamikaze Advantage - Japan starts the game with the Kamikaze Elite Forces development.
  5. Long-Range Aircraft Advantage - Japan starts the game with the Long-Range aircraft weapon development.
  6. Naval Production Advantage - All naval units produced from Japan cost 20% less. This advantage is cumulative with Industrial Technology development, if it is acquired. Japan also has the option of purchasing, prior to the start of the game, an additional naval unit, which may be stationed in any sea zone already occupied by a Japanese naval unit. This purchased unit may be utilized immediately, and need not be placed at the end of the Japan's turn.

United StatesEdit

  1. Industrial Advantage - United States starts the game with Industrial Technology development.
  2. Allied Bomber Advantage - United States starts the game with a bomber stationed in the United Kingdom.
  3. Hawaiian Fighter Advantage - United States starts the game with a second fighter on the carrier stationed at Hawaii.
  4. First Strike Advantage - Americans may go first, prior to the Soviets for the cost of 30 IPCs. Turn sequence continues normally beyond that.
  5. Marines - Americans start the game with the Marines Elite Forces development.
  6. Chinese Advantage - One additional infantry on China and Sianking. The Americans may also station (prior to the start of the game) an existing American fighter in China or Sianking.
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